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Magic Market Index for April 20th, 2018
 
Pauper Review: Dominaria
 
The Limited Archetypes of Dominaria
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    Scum!Shadow or Town!Shadow:
    A glorious game of guess my alignment!
    (Bonus points if you can name the game)


    Round 2 winner: No one!
    I was town, the game was Pirates Mafia!

    Third round:
    Quote from Past Shadow »
    You stand a good chance of being lynched today and if you actually are putting in as much effort as you say, that should bother you. It bothers me because regardless of your alignment, you're not playing to it, and that makes the game frustrating. For goodness sakes do something.
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    (Also I’ve decided for current and future rounds of Scum!shadow or Town!Shadow to wait until someone has answered both alignments, so as to keep it fair. Or you know, like enough time that no one else is replying)
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    I agree, I don't think we need to waste much more time letting him pollute this thread.
    I wouldn’t say it’s entirely fair to accuse me of polluting the thread; I’m trying to make my own lemonade, not intentionally at the expense of anyone.
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    Scum!Shadow or Town!Shadow:
    A glorious game of guess my alignment!
    (Bonus points if you can name the game)


    Round 1 winner: Dawning!
    I was town, the game was Dark and Stormy Night Mafia!

    Second round:
    Quote from Past Shadow »
    Frankly I need to read that again because I don’t remember your push on him. Part of it is I think your play looks much more like daft scum![player] that can get away with whatever the crap you want, and I’m not ready to eat crow and say you’re just town.
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!

    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    Quote from shadowlancerx »
    Shadow, stop spamming the thread.

    DAYKILL: KJ
    I will take joy in the one thing I have left thank you very much.

    You didn’t shoot me...pity.
    (But really we both know you didn’t actually shoot anyone.)
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    Shadow, stop spamming the thread.

    DAYKILL: KJ
    I will take joy in the one thing I have left thank you very much.

    You didn’t shoot me...pity.
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    Scum!Shadow or Town!Shadow:
    A glorious game of guess my alignment!
    (Bonus points if you can name the game)


    Rules: I post something that I’ve posted in the past, then whoever wants to guesses what alignment I was when I posted it! If you guess the game and alignment then congrats, you’re an overachiever!

    First round:

    Quote from Past Shadow »
    You may not have, but it's basically the assumption that in most games, among the bottom posters, at least one is scum. As far as the rule itself goes, seen it not apply, but do you give that idea or a similar one any weight?
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    There is no denying that wolves are both fascinating as well as controversial in our world today. We do know that they are derived from the canidae family at some level.
    There are other relatives out there in the canine family that wolves are closely related to. They include the coyote. It isn’t uncommon for some types of dogs to be mistaken for wolves in some areas. For example the Alaskan Husky and the Alaskan Malamute.
    Through careful research we are able to understand much more about them than in the past. These animals aren’t out there looking for humans to hunt as some legends say. Instead they are instinctively driven to do all they can to survive. Wolves are very social animals. They thrive off of the freedoms and the restraints found within their own pack.
    The howling of wolves can seem very scary and eerie to people. Yet researchers have found there is quite a bit of meaning in such sounds. They can be used to call out to the rest of the pack, as a warning for introducers or emotion signals.
    The largest amount of wolf research has been dedicated to the element of their social hierarchy because is one of the most complex. Yet it allows them to be able to provide the level of care and harmony within their pack that is necessary. In spite of what most people think, wolves are able to get along very well with each other. They seldom have conflicts inside of their own pack.
    Wolves value family in much the same way that humans do. They have respect for each other, work as a team, and even help to care for young that aren’t their own. It is this type of research that has shown us wolves aren’t monsters out there looking to kill everything in site.
    What we do know from research though is that these are very instinctive animals. They have the ability to adapt to a variety of different environments. They aren’t killing machines but animals that have the ability to be able to find food sources so that they can continue to survive.
    Many people wonder about wolves and attacks on humans. Even if you spend days looking for information you will find very few reports about them attacking. In those instances when it has occurred it has been connected to wolves having rabies. A person is much more likely to be attacked by other types of animals than this one should they be in the wilderness.

    A great deal of information that we have about the movements of wolves is due to the use of tracking devices. This helps to find out which ones may be a given problem in areas where cattle are being destroyed. They also help to identify the home range for a given wolf pack. It is very interesting to see how they live, and that information can help with successfully creating homes for them in captivity and reintroducing them to the wild.
    Even though wolf research has been able to offer us an inside look in many areas, it isn’t enough to tell us the entire story. There is still plenty more than has to be looked into before we are able to fully understand these magnificent creatures. The fact that so many of the species are in danger of extinction though means that we may not be able to learn enough about them before it is too late.
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    How very unsurprising, I’m not dead!

    Hey Terry, how’s it goin’?
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    Guys, I don’t mean to alarm anyone, but I think the auction house got robbed!
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    And I think Shadow tried to destroy my gun (flavor PM implies), but I still have a fully functioning Tommy Gun, so I think whoever saved me must have had a full cycle protection on me. I did lose 2 gold though.
    you received the notice just now? hmm could be some kind of item bomb.
    I got a message saying I got it. Then shortly after got another message saying that I was targeted by a vandal who attempted to destroy all of my items, but that my items were only damaged and cost 2 gold to repair. My sanity remained the same.
    Interesting. Tell us more!
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    And I think Shadow tried to destroy my gun (flavor PM implies), but I still have a fully functioning Tommy Gun, so I think whoever saved me must have had a full cycle protection on me. I did lose 2 gold though.
    Shoot me then.
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    I thought this was interesting. You all might like it too.

    The octopus is an asocial genius that survives by its wits. The common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) lives from 12 to 18 months. A mature female mates, lays tens of thousands of eggs, tends them until they hatch, and dies soon thereafter. The tiny octopus hatchlings disperse quickly and seldom encounter others of their species until they eventually mate. The hatchlings spend 45 to 60 days floating in ocean currents and feeding in the plankton layer where most of them perish, becoming food for other predators. The small proportion that survive this stage grow rapidly, “parachute” to the sea floor, and begin a bottom dwelling life in an environment that is quite different from the plankton environment. When they land on the bottom, typically far away from where they hatched, octopuses must learn very quickly and be very lucky to survive.

    The typical adult octopus has a relatively large brain, estimated at 300 million neurons. The ratio of octopus brain to body mass is much higher than that of most fish and amphibians, a ratio more similar to that of birds and mammals. The complex lobes of the octopus brain support an acute and sensitive vision system, good spatial memory, decision-making, and camouflage behavior. “Sensory and motor function is neatly separated into a series of well-defined lobes... There are two parallel learning systems, one for touch and one for vision, and a clear hierarchy of motor control.” Each arm has smaller, mostly independent neural systems (about 50 million neurons each) that deal with chemical sensors, delicate touch sensors, force sensors, and control of the muscles in that arm. All this processing power supports general intelligence, but at a cost. Neurons use more energy than other cells. Just the photoreceptors in the eyes of a fly consume 8% of the fly’s resting energy. The metabolic costs of an octopus’ large brain must be justified by its contribution to rapid learning of more effective foraging and more effective defenses against predators.

    Adult octopuses are quite clever, adaptable, and rapid learners. Experts speculate that most octopus behaviors are learned independently rather than being based on instinct. At least one researcher posits that cephalopods may even have a primitive form of consciousness.

    Unlike the octopus, humans can rely upon a large legacy of knowledge learned from, and actively taught by, parents, peers, and the culture at large. Social animals also make use of legacies of information that they are able to effectively transfer from one individual to the next and one generation to the next. More effective knowledge legacies go hand-in-hand with more intelligent reasoning although the correlation is far from perfect, as the octopus demonstrates.
    Posted in: Mafia
  • posted a message on Arkham Horror Mafia - Day 2 Break In!
    Quote from shadowlancerx »
    You might want to get that looked at.
    I don't get it.
    Try to shoot me Grin
    Posted in: Mafia
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