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  • posted a message on The State of Modern Thread (B&R 21/01/2019)
    Quote from Hert79 »
    Quote from Grim_Flayer »
    Quote from Wraithpk »
    So, does this GP result solidify for anyone else that GB Rock is the best build of the GBx Midrange decks? I know people have been trying to force Jund for the past year, but the consistency and power you get from the two color manabase seems to be where it's at.


    In my opinion, Golgari has been better positioned than Jund overall since the printing of Trophy, and this GP result sure doesn’t hurt the case!

    Conversations along these lines happens with great frequency:

    - What are the advantages to playing straight BG over Jund (or Abzan/Sultai)?
    - A relatively painless, more consistent, and utility-rich mana base, mostly.
    - Well yeah, but is a better mana base really worth giving up Bolt/BBE/K-Command/Ravine/Path/Souls/Stony Silence?
    - Yep, it sure is!

    The beneficial ripple effects of such a mana base are legion, especially in the context of a midrange deck. Being just two colors saves a significant number of life points against aggro decks. 3-4 Fields of Ruin grants all kinds of edges against big mana decks, manlands, 3c goodstuff decks, and decks which play few basics (and the printing of Trophy has made Field even better). You’re very unlikely to lose to your own mana base via color screw. You get to play Treetop Village, which is a game-winning card. You’ve got a higher density of G sources for Scavenging Ooze relative to other BGx decks. You’re quite resilient to Blood Moon relative to other BGx decks.

    I could go on, but woe to those who underestimate the importance of a clean and powerful mana base in a midrange deck. Grin

    BG was already better then the other gbx decks way before trophy was printed. Field of Ruin was the turning point imo,2 color decks can play it and dont suffer from it.


    I personally agree with you—Field was a massive, massive boost, and enough to put Golgari over the top, following the spate of great prints in 2016–but I think Trophy is what firmly cemented Golgari at the peak of the BGx hierarchy. Or, at least, it’s the printing that gave Rock the public perception of being there or thereabouts relative to Jund’s power level.
    Posted in: Modern
  • posted a message on The State of Modern Thread (B&R 21/01/2019)
    Quote from Wraithpk »
    So, does this GP result solidify for anyone else that GB Rock is the best build of the GBx Midrange decks? I know people have been trying to force Jund for the past year, but the consistency and power you get from the two color manabase seems to be where it's at.


    In my opinion, Golgari has been better positioned than Jund overall since the printing of Trophy, and this GP result sure doesn’t hurt the case!

    Conversations along these lines happens with great frequency:

    - What are the advantages to playing straight BG over Jund (or Abzan/Sultai)?
    - A relatively painless, more consistent, and utility-rich mana base, mostly.
    - Well yeah, but is a better mana base really worth giving up Bolt/BBE/K-Command/Ravine/Path/Souls/Stony Silence?
    - Yep, it sure is!

    The beneficial ripple effects of such a mana base are legion, especially in the context of a midrange deck. Being just two colors saves a significant number of life points against aggro decks. 3-4 Fields of Ruin grants all kinds of edges against big mana decks, manlands, 3c goodstuff decks, and decks which play few basics (and the printing of Trophy has made Field even better). You’re very unlikely to lose to your own mana base via color screw. You get to play Treetop Village, which is a game-winning card. You’ve got a higher density of G sources for Scavenging Ooze relative to other BGx decks. You’re quite resilient to Blood Moon relative to other BGx decks.

    I could go on, but woe to those who underestimate the importance of a clean and powerful mana base in a midrange deck. Grin
    Posted in: Modern
  • posted a message on The Rock
    Quote from yriel »
    @Grim_Flayer : well thanks for answer but don't board in Engineered Explosives against a deck with a bunch of 2-drop and master of waves token is strange.
    When my opponent have trickster AND harbinger of tides and graveyard hate ( i am quite surprised if merfolk players go play a tournament with 0 sb card against graveyard ) tarmogoyf power slow down a lot because attack is bad, block is harder so your goyf can make good attack and block only when you have manage the rest of your opponent deck, i don't see in which world BGX can race merfolk. I don't agree with your vision of "midrange merfolk", in top deck war BGX win very easily, you just need to reach that moment.


    Whoops, I missed EE from your list. You absolutely want that, no question!

    Merfolk don’t go entirely without grave hate, but Surgical Extraction has supplanted Relic to a notable degree, with Mistcaller also adding a few percentage points in some of those matchups. You’re just about as likely to see 3-4 Surgical and 0 Relic as you are 3-4 Relic and 0 Surgical these days, with a few decks playing 1-2 of each, and cards like Tormod’s Crypt and Grafdigger’s Cage making occasional appearances. Relic is the only card we care about from that group, so for the purposes of evaluating Goyf vs Merfolk, he’s on average a lot safer than he used to be.

    Harbinger is good against Goyf, but it’s even better against the rest of our threats: it can reset the counters on Scooze, Tracker, and Kalitas; it delays Bob’s trigger, which has the potential to become a liability the longer it’s delayed; and Goyf is as cheap or cheaper than any of our other threats in terms of how much tempo we lose by having to re-cast them. I also don’t believe we want to reduce our threat count overall in this matchup, especially with Harbinger in mind.

    Golgari can race Merfolk by interacting T1, sticking a T2 threat, and then going back to interacting. Even if they bounce or otherwise deal with that T2 threat, chunking their life total early on a couple times is very relevant—this stops them from being able to turn their board sideways for two big Islandwalking swings, for fear of dying on the crack back after the first one.
    Posted in: Midrange
  • posted a message on The Rock
    Quote from yriel »
    One question :
    i think my SB plan against merfolk should be :
    -4 tarmogoyf, -3 LotV
    +1 disfigure +1 tracker +1 EE +1 maelstrom pulse
    +1 kitchen finks +1 damnation +1 languish
    Merfolk trickster + islandwalker + harbinger of the tides or to many ways to manage goyf i think. (and sometimes SB relic of progenitus)

    I will probably make an other sum-up after more leagues.
    Thanks for reading and any answers.


    I’ve got a pretty different take on the Merfolk matchup. While this is probably the only deck against which we’d even consider trimming Goyfs, I definitely don’t think you cut the playset, especially because Relics aren’t terribly common in their 75s anymore. Trickster is a beating, but even that is sometimes only a 3-of now.

    I also think you can leverage LoTV well enough to keep 2 in, and that trimming some number of discard spells is correct, because 1) they’re almost a midrange deck insofar as the importance of our topdecks and having answers to their board is concerned, and 2) Golgari doesn’t get wrecked by Spreading Seas anywhere near as hard as Jund and Abzan do.

    With your list, I’d make these changes:

    -2 Thoughtseize
    -1 Tarmogoyf
    -1 LoTV

    +1 Damnation
    +1 Languish
    +1 Pulse
    +1 Disfigure

    The Finks is potentially fine as well, so if you want that I’d cut an IoK (play) or Bob (draw).
    Posted in: Midrange
  • posted a message on The Rock
    Quote from Magicka »
    Hi all,

    New GB player here.

    I just bought the full playset of tarmo and lili but i dont have any Bob and i'm a little bit low on cash right now, what would be the best alternative?

    Creatures in my deck for the moment are:

    4 scavenging ooze
    4 tarmo
    2 tireless tracker
    1 kalithas
    1 tasigur
    4 gifted aetherborn

    Thank you in advance


    Welcome!

    GB is a deck that requires a hefty dose of card advantage in order to successfully execute our plan of interacting heavily and then pulling ahead on resources in the mid/late game. As you’ve identified, Confidant is the best way to incorporate this mechanic, but until you’re able to acquire some copies of him, you probably want to be running the full 4 Tireless Tracker. While she isn’t a like-for-like replacement, she’s clearly the second most effective card advantage engine on a stick in our colors.

    Building around Tracker means you probably want to play 25 lands. This higher land count, alongside the absence of Bob, incentivizes a second Tasigur (who can also serve as a card advantage engine).

    4 Goyf
    4 Tracker
    3-4 Scooze
    2 Tasigur
    0-1 Kalitas

    That’s what your maindeck creature configuration should probably look like. Gifted Aetherborn is a card that I love (it was central to my attempts to make both mono-Black Devotion and Vampire Tribal work in Modern when I was newer to the format), but it’s not the sort of card Rock is really in the market for. We want threats that can double as advantage engines and/or pieces of interaction. Tarmogoyf is the only exception to this rule, and that’s simply because his gigantic stats are too good to pass up in this shell that tends to grow him quickly, and also because we need to be proactive enough to end games in a hurry. Aetherborn is a well-rounded value creature, but does not generate card advantage or interact with the opponent’s strategy, nor does it put on a particularly fast clock.

    Good luck and let us know how it goes!
    Posted in: Midrange
  • posted a message on The Rock
    Quote from FlyingDelver »
    @Grim_Flayer First of all congrats to your live league, it is really enjoyable to watch you play, keep it up!

    Concerning the Amulet matchup, the thing to keep in mind is that they will and should board out Amulets against you after game 1. The reason is, that as we are not a very fast deck, they don't need to be fast either (as Amulet essentially only generates tempo and acceleration). So, I would personally not bother about Amulets after Game 1. However, this is not a complete clear thing to do also from the AMulet players perspective. Some people still might bring them in. In such as case I like to keep Decays if you run them. Decays are more reliable than Push to kill an Azusa, and Decay can also kill Scout and the Amulet if they really leave them in. I think from our deck the weakest cards are Push and Scooze. Push does kill Scout and Azusa, but I think most of the time those are not the realy problematic cards. The cards you loose to is the Titan itself or Hornet Queen. We want all our TS, Trophies, LoTV and ideally Damnation for potential killing of the endgame threats. The goal of Amulet is just to go bigger than we do in chaining titans. We want to disrupt them and drop a fast goyf before they can cast Hornet queen.

    I would probably keep CB, as you can kill Azusa, Scout and also take Pacts/Stirrings potentially.

    EE is only really appealing to clear up Hornet Queen Tokens imo. Other than that I think EE is not worth it.

    Push is rather weak, but not sure how many to cut. I think somewhere around 1-2 copies to cut is correct. I guess having access to a couple copies is nice.

    Yeah I would cut Kalitas and 1 Ooze also.

    The matchup is unfavourable for us though.

    Good luck!


    Thanks for the kind words my dude, and thanks even more for all the great work you’ve done and continue to do here! I’d probably still be struggling with the learning curve of this deck if it wasn’t for your primer and posts.

    Sounds like we’re on the same page with regard to how to approach the Amulet matchup. I’m definitely leaving in my Decay; I agree that it’s a high value card. Interesting insight about high level Amulet players siding out the namesake card; that affirms my decision to omit EE.

    Yeah, Push is a tricky one to evaluate. I can agree that cutting 1-2 seems correct, depending on what else you have to bring in (and also depending on how well you know the opponent’s exact build, for instance if you resolve a Surgical G2 and then play G3).

    Damnation makes sense. I don’t have one in my current 75, but I think I would have brought one in if I’d had access to it. I can also agree that the matchup is unfavorable, but I don’t think it’s all that bad post-Trophy. G1 we have our usual combination of clock and disruption that serves us well against most combo decks (although their big mana-style inevitability is a countervailing factor) and post-side we improve immensely with access to Fulminator and some other great tools.

    After Trophy, it feels like no matchup is consistently all that bad for us (except maybe Living End lol).
    Posted in: Midrange
  • posted a message on The Rock
    Quote from yriel »
    Well, if i have a high skill with death shadow i probably test seriously it but the deck is hard to play and i don't have time.
    I think death shadow is better against unfair deck and control and BGX is better against other.
    In US, there are a lot of KCI, hardened scales deck where death shadow is far better than rock, in Europe there is a lot of phoenix and spirits where Rock is better, i am not sure but it's my feedback. On MTGO the high number of phoenix make me happy to play Rock.


    I agree with everything here, and I too would probably try my hand at Shadow if I had more time to play...but with free time at a premium in my life, I’m very much content to be playing all Golgari, all the time. Grin

    @FlyingDelver (and others), I’d be curious as to your thoughts on how to sideboard against Amulet Titan. In one of my matches yesterday (see below), I faced down Titan and made the following changes:

    +3 Fulminator
    +1 Deathmark
    +1 Pulse
    +1 Surgical

    -2 Last Hope
    -1 Spellbomb
    -1 Kalitas
    -1 Scooze
    -1 Fatal Push

    Some murky areas include:

    - How good is Brutality? Medium, in my estimation, so I left the maindeck one in but didn’t bring in the second from the side.
    - How good is Engineered Explosives? I’d say better on the play than the draw, because it’s mostly good for cleaning up Amulets and Sakura-Tribe Scouts...but even on the play I’m not sure we want it.
    - Fatal Push? I trimmed one. It’s our best early answer to Scout, Azusa, and Ballista, but we don’t want to be staring at multiple Pushes in hand when they drop a Titan or other big haymaker.
    - I trimmed away Kalitas and a Scooze as far as dropping a couple threats went, rating Tireless Tracker more highly (Goyf and Bob obviously stay in). I think this is correct, but I’m willing to entertain other perspectives on this.

    Any thoughts? Another matchup to consider so far as sideboarding protocols are concerned is the monored Phoenix deck; I’d welcome any feedback there as well.

    Finally, for those who haven’t yet seen these games, I played my first ever live-recorded competitive league (in the past, I had only uploaded comp league games as replays), and it was a ton of fun! I’m having trouble formatting the links correctly from my phone, but they’re the five most recent vids on the channel linked in my signature (first match vs Storm, last match vs Titan). Good times!
    Posted in: Midrange
  • posted a message on The Rock
    I'm no Shadow expert, but are they much better positioned against the graveyard decks of the format than Golgari?

    My understanding is that Shadow's super-high density of discard + Stubborn Denial + rapid clock puts them in pole position against linear combo decks, but their unique life mechanics and low threat density means they struggle against go-wide decks compared to us.

    Honestly, Grixis Shadow is probably a tad better positioned than Golgari overall at the moment, but I truly do not believe the difference is more than marginal. My vote is for the Rock, but honestly I really enjoy the concept of Shadow as well, and wouldn't fault you for taking an audible to that deck if your results have been strong.
    Posted in: Midrange
  • posted a message on Taking Turns
    I’ve been away from the archetype for a bit now, and I don’t have any real experience on UR Turns, buuuuuttt...

    https://scryfall.com/card/rna/99/electrodominance

    This enables Ancestral Vision (which I’ve always felt is a reasonable card in Turns generally) at Instant speed and immediate resolution, and so far as using the card itself to keep the board clear or go upstairs, you could do worse. Intriguing!
    Posted in: Modern Archives - Established
  • posted a message on The State of Modern Thread (B&R 26/11/2018)
    Quote from sicsmoo »
    Quote from Grim_Flayer »
    ^Interesing data, guys.

    On a related note: I once read (can’t remember where) some statistics from a player with an enormous amount of matches on the same deck reporting a ~5% (from memory) winrate decline when comparing Friendly League results with those of Competitive Leagues. In other words, a pilot whose winrate is 60% over the course of many Friendlies could reasonably expect to clock in around 55% in Comps.

    Does anyone here have supporting or countervailing data/experiences?
    Interesting you should bring that up, as I set out to test that exact thing this month. I recently talked to a Storm grinder a bit who had reported a 68% win rate in Friendly over around 1000 matches, and it really piqued my interest; it seemed almost too good to be true. The vast majority of my recorded games with Tron prior to this month have been played in Comp leagues (around 1900) and my winrate in that sample is right around 60%. In December I've played the deck exclusively in the Friendly room, and over 240 matches so far my winrate is 65.5%. So I can definitely see the ~5% figure being accurate. For me it's closer to 6% as things stand now.

    In terms of why it's that much easier, I've noticed a few things:

    There's a higher percentage of homebrew/rogue decks. Not tons, but it's maybe 6% in Friendly as opposed to like 3% in Comp. I'm talking about decks like Mono Blue Boomerangs or GW Midrange with Search For Tomorrow and Farseek to "synergize" with Tireless Tracker and Courser of Kruphix, with no disruption of any kind. These are almost always free wins, and there are more of them.

    There's a higher occurrence of loose/suboptimal plays. Quite a few times this month I saw my opponents do things like crack fetches main phase getting a tapped shockland, or firing off instant speed burn spells main phase, when they could hold the mana up and represent any number of things. I don't often see things like that in the Comp leagues.

    There's also a higher occurrence of people playing meta decks but with some suboptimal card choices for the sake of interest or fun. That's all well and good, but the cards are suboptimal for a reason, and you will be handing your opponents some percentage points as a result.

    On the whole though, ~5% is not a massive difference. It's still mostly good players playing good decks.

    What about the EV though? Using the Goatbots EV calculator, about 7% is the key number when comparing Comp and Friendly. If your Comp winrate is 58%, and your Friendly winrate is 65%, that's basically the equilibrium point. +3.46 for Comp, and +3.42 for Friendly. If your Comp winrate is 59% and Friendly is 66%, you're better off playing Comp, as it becomes +4.09 vs +3.69, and the gap continues to widen as your winrate increases. On the flipside, if your Comp winrate is only 57% and you get 64% in Friendly, the EV is +2.83 vs +3.15 in favor of Friendly, and the gap continues to widen as your winrate goes down. 7% is a fairly big difference though, and given my experience that would seem hard to sustain. So if you can consistently achieve 59% win in Comp, that's the better EV play.


    Wonderful post, man. This is exactly the sort of reply I was looking for. I can certainly accept 6% as an accurate approximation of expected winrate differential for the typical player. Thanks also for bringing up the EV angle; that’s something I hadn’t closely considered.
    Posted in: Modern Archives
  • posted a message on The State of Modern Thread (B&R 26/11/2018)
    ^Interesing data, guys.

    On a related note: I once read (can’t remember where) some statistics from a player with an enormous amount of matches on the same deck reporting a ~5% (from memory) winrate decline when comparing Friendly League results with those of Competitive Leagues. In other words, a pilot whose winrate is 60% over the course of many Friendlies could reasonably expect to clock in around 55% in Comps.

    Does anyone here have supporting or countervailing data/experiences?
    Posted in: Modern Archives
  • posted a message on The State of Modern Thread (B&R 26/11/2018)
    Quote from Galerion »
    Quote from Spsiegel1987 »
    I saw your name in the practice rooms a few times yesterday, Galerion. I had a half day at work so I was able to just get some practice games in.

    I used to invest into like every deck as well. I'm pretty much accepting that I own every GBx staple and Shadow. I have a decent amount of the URx staples, too. But I mean, I have a case and a half of GBx cards to pretty much playing anything that emerges unless it's using something obscure. I have Tron, just because it's nice to own and doesn't intersect with other stuff.

    I would like to play Humans, but I have to be more responsible with my money nowadays and shouldn't just blow 1,500 dollars. Playing 4 different decks at once doesn't seem like good practice, either.

    I had a lot of pieces into Phoenix so I thought, "why not?"

    Owning the URx and GBx stuff really helps out. If you own all the shock lands/fetches and those you're pretty set. It's only when Tribal decks or combo decks emerge that I feel priced out. The Phoenix deck only required Arclight, Thing in the Ice, and the Manamorphose.

    I'm pretty much just keeping my staples though, selling off staples has just hurt way more than helped. I sold off the UW Control pieces like 2x Teferi, 1x Jace, 1x Cryptic (4 seems like too much in modern nowadays) because I know I won't be going back to a super slow deck like that again. I still decided to keep things like Clique, 3x Jaces, etc because you never know.


    Yesterday? Yeah that was the The Rock day. I must admit it felt good playing it again and the new tools like Assassin's Trophy and Tireless Tracker did tons of work. I was impressed.

    But it also made me realize that I personally don't want to stick with a non-blue deck anymore. Little anecdote.
    Yesterday I kept a decent BG hand and played turn 1 Inquistion of Kozilek and I see a hand of Faithless Looting, Night's Whisper, Through the Breach and lands so I was up against Goryo's Vengeance and I take the Looting away. On turn 2 I fire off another Inquistion and take Night's Whisper away. On turn 3 I play a Dark Confidant and after that nothing interesting happens until he has 5 lands in play. He obviously plays Through the Breach and put's Worldspine Wurm into play. I have the Assassins's Trohpy ready to avoid taking 15 from the wurm but he still gets the 3 5/5 Wurm tokens with Trample. What happens? With the Confidant trigger I reveal my single copy of Maelstrom Pulse, kill the tokens with it and win the game from there. My opponent wrote me "topdeck of the year" and despite me just answering with "yeah that's what the deck does" he was absolutely right.

    The limitations of the deck were obvious in this game. Despite me having a decent hand with two discard spells, a Confidant and removal I could have easily lost that game. Inquisition is fine but its limitation of 3 CMC or less means I could not take his Breach away and the deck cannot interact any other way with that card.
    Things like planeswalkers, permanents with ETB or LTB abilities and instants and sorceries all need to be interacted with on the stack. Otherwise the opponent will gain value out of them or outright win the game. With something like Stubborn Denial in my hand I would have had that game 100% on lock instead of having to get so incredibly lucky.

    I still don't know if I want to stick with GDS but if I would have to choose between it and the BG/x decks my choice is now pretty clear.


    Not to be that guy who always jumps in to defend BGx, but maybe I’m just actually that guy who always jumps in to defend BGx. Grin

    First of all, I’m a huge fan of Grixis/4c Shadow. The deck is the real deal and I’d happily agree with the consensus that it’s the most well-positioned Thoughtseize deck in the format right now.

    That said, your anecdote doesn’t really serve as a condemnation of BGx’s power IMO. You had a solid hand, sure, but so did your opponent! A great many decks in the format would easily have been in for an early death, assuming some decent finds off Looting and Whisper. You also lacked a clock, and most times, if an early progression of discard into Bob isn’t setting your opponent back then finding you a clock, it’s setting your opponent back then finding you answers, which is what happened here. Finally, Shadow could indeed have had that game on lock more readily, but remember that Shadow thrives against combo decks—those Stubbs look a lot worse when the opponent is playing one of the format’s Aether Vial decks.

    Again, I agree that Shadow is arguably the best place to be right now if you want to interact, especially if your heart’s not in the idea of BGx and/or you’re feeling the allure of what U brings to the table. But this notion that BGx is a far-distant second that just doesn’t have what it takes to rumble in Modern (not that you’ve said this, but it’s been implied elsewhere in this thread)...man, I just don’t see that at all. Every opposing matchup is within reason for a well-tuned Jund or Golgari deck now that Trophy has helped close the gap against big mana.


    On the topic of the relative difficulty of the format’s most popular decks, the author’s personal ratings are fairly reasonable IMO. Personally, I’ve hopped decks an embarrassing number of times, having owned GB Elves, UBw Mill, Norin Sisters, Living End, D&T, Humans, UW Control, Ad Nauseam, Taking Turns, and Abzan/Golgari. For me, the linear aggro or combo decks were by far easier to pilot optimally than the interactive decks like D&T, BGx, and UWC (which I played during the pre-Jace meta when Shadow was king and the UWC decks were doing a lot of tapping out for Seas, Gideons, and Verdicts). I say this in full acknowledgment that I’ve never extensively played some of the more complex combo decks like Amulet Titan; nevertheless, my experience has been that linearity correlates with more easily obtained proficiency, on the whole.

    Anyone can cast a Thoughtseize, a JtMS, or a Leonin Arbiter, but navigating your way to consistently strong results on the backs of those cards in a format as broad as this one is a very different story!
    Posted in: Modern Archives
  • posted a message on The Rock
    Akalah, thanks for posting the breakdown for us. Always nice to read how others are doing and the touts on the wins and losses.

    I went 2-2 at FNM, with the Arclight deck as a loss, and that was the deck that went undefeated. I have done well against that deck online and went 1-2 irl. Beginning on the draw seems to be a bigger negative than against many other decks. Also my opponant was a very skilled player... better than me. I have faith in the BG build and believe that with tight play I can beat any deck. A dash of luck never hurts either.

    On to the build... I used 3 Bobs, but think I will play with 4 going in ahead. Kalitas is a favorite of mine, but likely will put two in side with none in main. Keeping 3 trackers in main and use 4 liliana of the veils... on the play she is just money. I miss abrupt decay and will have to find room for one or two in the main. I will tighten things up and hope to report a better record next week.

    Since the forum is quiet I decided to ramble on as Led Zeppelin would say...


    Zeppelin <3

    I’ve been doing well against the Phoenix decks, too—I think we’re solidly positioned against them—but their consistency means that they can punish us if we stumble. Similar to Burn in many ways, including play/draw, as you identified.

    Including the 4th Bob is something that’s crossed my mind as well, but I’d toyed with moving Tracker #3 to the side in his place. It’s so tough to say, but 3/3 has served me so well since I moved off the Tasigur build that for now I suppose it’s a matter of not fixing what ain’t broke. Let us know how 4x Bobby works out for you!
    Posted in: Midrange
  • posted a message on The State of Modern Thread (B&R 26/11/2018)
    I see little reason to be pessimistic about the future of this format (which should inform how we feel about the present state of Modern, of course).

    WotC very obviously realizes the need to print powerful answer cards in new sets. KTK and id listed most of the recent ones a few pages back: Trophy, Sphere, etc. To me, this development is extremely encouraging, and I don’t think it’s quite recieved its due among the Modern community as a clear sign that answers (and therefore interaction) are going to be designed to thrive in eternal formats.

    Would I like Modern to be more interactive than it is now? Yes, without question, and it seems that the majority shares this view. Still, the demise of interactive decks has been greatly exaggerated. We’re still doing fine in the meta—not amazing, but fine—and moving forward we can expect 1) new answers will continuously be printed with Modern (or Legacy) in mind, 2) any realistic unbans will surely help “fair”/interactive decks more than linear ones, and 3) any possible bans (which will likely only be used as a last resort) are almost certainly going to be aimed at something hyper-linear that shrugs off interaction, like Dredge.

    Finally—and this is merely anecdotal—my two most recent (Friendly) leagues with Golgari went 4-1 and 5-0, and I did it while commentating live, which, let me tell ya, definitely makes playing optimally a lot harder, especially if you’re as new to it as I am! My advice is this: find a reasonably powerful deck that you love on every level and stick with it through thick and thin. Knowing your own deck is the key to success in this format, and the broader the metagame gets, the truer that will become IMO.
    Posted in: Modern Archives
  • posted a message on The State of Modern Thread (B&R 26/11/2018)
    +1 for older basics. I run Onslaught Swamps and Forests in Golgari and couldn’t be happier about it!
    Posted in: Modern Archives
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