The end of the storyline.

  • #26
    Quote from LilianaVess33

    But wait at least we still have Savor the Flavor, right? oh. thats right we have a 1054 post long thread here of people complaining about it, and now that's gone too....... riiiiiaaaaaggggghhhhhhtttttt bang up job boys.

    What really just gets to me is I obviously love Lili for person reasons, and I've been waiting since Agents of Artifice to get a book devoted to her....... Just as they're about to release 2 books featuring her, it all goes black.

    Damn it Brady the books already written, cover art already completed, release the damn thing. I wanted Lili to read it when she got older.


    Savor the Flavor IS coming back. Boy is it ever tiresome to have to say that over and over again. They just couldn't get somebody to take over by the time Doug stepped out. Seriously getting tired of it...

    And the Curse of the Chain Veil wasn't exactly going to be great. I've read some of Vornholt's other material, and if you thought Wintermute was bad, then you haven't seen how low a book can sink. Brady flat out stated that the book was so far off their expectations they COULDN'T publish it. Just think about that, if they printed Quest for Karn, how off must Curse have been?

    What's more, is that Curse was supposed to have been out BEFORE Mirrodin started. It isn't like they had two books about to come out for Liliana. They'd already scrapped one.
  • #27
    Quote from Barinellos
    Savor the Flavor IS coming back. Boy is it ever tiresome to have to say that over and over again. They just couldn't get somebody to take over by the time Doug stepped out. Seriously getting tired of it...

    And the Curse of the Chain Veil wasn't exactly going to be great. I've read some of Vornholt's other material, and if you thought Wintermute was bad, then you haven't seen how low a book can sink. Brady flat out stated that the book was so far off their expectations they COULDN'T publish it. Just think about that, if they printed Quest for Karn, how off must Curse have been?

    What's more, is that Curse was supposed to have been out BEFORE Mirrodin started. It isn't like they had two books about to come out for Liliana. They'd already scrapped one.


    This.

    And i don't think it's fair to blame the 'boards for what happened. Numbers don't lie, and it basically boiled down to the bottom line. Yeah, the latest round of books have been crappy, but don't forget that even their better books were a niche market at best. We can discuss all day on what they could have done differently marketing-wise for those books, but the end result is still that NONE of their books did well, regardless of the quality of the writing. and our complaints about StF really don't seem to factor much into them taking it off the shelf for a while. if that were the case, They'd have pulled the plug on Beyer months ago.

    and yeah, Lilly's book was stillborn for a reason. your desire reminds me of the Monkey's Paw story where the wife wished to see her son after he died, and the son came knocking at the door...:rolleyes:
    trust me. You didn't want that book.
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  • #29
    To quote Brady Dommermuth:

    I want to respond to Voila!'s posts over at MTGS, too. Please know that across the 66 published Magic novels, we have tried every combination of more/less creative control, more/less time, and more/less money. No combination of those elements guarantees a great novel. (And I'll reiterate that the novels you think are great are generally in the bottom half sales-wise, and the novels you loathe are generally in the top half. There are exceptions.) Great novels are rare, and many of them take YEARS to write.

    Unlike publishing companies who usually buy a book and publish it only if it's already good enough, we commissioned books on spec and had to publish what we got (after a few precious weeks of revision), regardless of how the final draft turned out. Only one book differed so sharply from our expectation that we elected not to publish it. You can probably figure out which.


    Curse of the Chain Veil wasn't going to be great, and they smartly put their foot down.

    And of course the bit about how historically money spent on a Magic novel doesn't equal to how well the book sells and how well it is received is important as well.
  • #30
    The problem continues though that the other player types will always get what they want as long as the card game continues. Melvin, Timmy, Johnny, and Spike are always going to get cards they want to continue. Vorthose on the other hand, is getting his back turned on him. Not that this is completely true, but that is at least how it feels. No, the books were not good. And no, the short stories and StF don't wrap everything up nicely for us. The fact remains though that it was nice to feel like Wizards was always trying to appeal to us as best they could. Now it feels like we were put in the back seat of the car, told to shut up, and deal.

    What I am saying is I don't want them to continue to produce bad novels with the storylines. I want StF to come back (which I know is...eventually) and I just want something more. Something to produce the story as full as they can and appeal to my needs as one of their target demographics/consumers so that I don't continually wonder what is going on in the story they claim is there.
  • #31
    I think you may be right in your sentiment, the only problem is that you are grouping "Flavor Seekers" in with the whole wide range of Vorthoses, while it's actually only a tiny sub-set of the whole Vorthos spectrum. Brady said it himself that with the very best estimates, only 1 in 10,000 players ever bought a book that wasn't in a fat pack. 0.01%. That's it.

    (Non-fat pack books being relevant to them because the fat packs were discounted so that the books were given away for free, so only the 0.01% of players were actually contributing to their revenue.)

    While people may have taken MaRo's remarks as insulting and/or callous, Wizards does what it does (dailymtg, tournaments, making a quality game that constantly changes, but remains balanced most of the time and is aware of power creep) because it sells product. Wizards is appealing all the other Vorthoses by moving to unique settings each year, depicted with unique art styles, and by increasing the prominence of top-down design... and I assume that helps with player retention and enthusiasm for the game. It helps to sell more product.

    But for us, the Vorthos part that seeks out more beyond the cards... we are so insignificant in the larger scheme of things and are costing Wizards money instead of making them money. Maybe a fully developed story told in novel form will help encourage us to keep playing and keep buying product, but the man hours it takes to execute on that, especially in proportion to how many of us there are compared to the entire player base... it just doesn't make sense.

    It doesn't make sense so much that the plot of each set is going to reduce in complexity.

    The answer to the question I think you're trying to get at is this: We won't be creating a plot of novel-like complexity and then trying to shoehorn it onto cards. Instead we'll be creating a plot we believe can be communicated through the means we have: cards, short videos, marketing efforts, and whatever other media venues materialize. Form follows function.

    - Brady Dommermusth


    The only potential light at the end of the tunnel, a light that might not even be there, is that a simpler plot can be told more easily in comic book form. A huge problem with a lot of the webcomics is that they felt rushed. When you compared them to their counterparts in the novels, it was easy to see why. They were trying to tell too much in a limited page count.

    The dream for me, at this point, would be for a 12-part mini-series that covered the central story of each block. The planewalkers already do feel like comic book characters anyway, and climaxes that don't end in deaths of the villain in a comic book is standard practice. (Which would work nicely if the central antagonist happened to be a planeswalker like Nicol Bolas, Tezzeret, etc). It can work if the plot is simple enough, and good stories can still be told. Plenty of excellent stories have been told in 12-issue arcs, or even less.

    And if that dream can't be reached, I could be happy with a regular ongoing Magic comic book. Wizards cannot stop creating new planeswalkers because they need to mix in new ones with the familiar to keep people interested in the cards. And each year there will be more and more planeswalkers that can't be used for longer and longer periods of time. It can't be helped. A block without a single new planeswalker might work once if the overall theme is right, but two years in a row? Three? Players will feel cheated that Wizards is only recycling planeswalkers we've seen before. (Perhaps that will plateau. There is probably a number large enough that it won't matter, but that won't be any time soon.)

    With so many planeswalkers with nothing to do, it seems to me that it only makes sense to allow them to have more prominence in the comics. Maybe Dack will always be the main character, maybe not, but as the years pass IDW will have a larger stable of characters to pull from that are just gathering dust.

    If the comic line actually exists years from now. There's the rub. That can't ever happen if no one buys these comics that are coming out now.

    It's a good thing the comics are of a pretty high quality, and that IDW is the perfect publisher for Wizards to have made a deal with. And sales have been good enough that IDW is going forward with a second mini-series, but it could end there. Magic certainly doesn't sell enough to get front page status on their website, so my dream is probably already dead.

    But still... I'm doing my part and buying the comics. I haven't been disappointed in them so far, and at this point all I can do is hope the comic line doesn't end with The Spell Thief mini-series.
  • #32
    I think you may be right in your sentiment, the only problem is that you are grouping "Flavor Seekers" in with the whole wide range of Vorthoses, while it's actually only a tiny sub-set of the whole Vorthos spectrum. Brady said it himself that with the very best estimates, only 1 in 10,000 players ever bought a book that wasn't in a fat pack. 0.01%. That's it.

    (Non-fat pack books being relevant to them because the fat packs were discounted so that the books were given away for free, so only the 0.01% of players were actually contributing to their revenue.)

    While people may have taken MaRo's remarks as insulting and/or callous, Wizards does what it does (dailymtg, tournaments, making a quality game that constantly changes, but remains balanced most of the time and is aware of power creep) because it sells product. Wizards is appealing all the other Vorthoses by moving to unique settings each year, depicted with unique art styles, and by increasing the prominence of top-down design... and I assume that helps with player retention and enthusiasm for the game. It helps to sell more product.

    But for us, the Vorthos part that seeks out more beyond the cards... we are so insignificant in the larger scheme of things and are costing Wizards money instead of making them money. Maybe a fully developed story told in novel form will help encourage us to keep playing and keep buying product, but the man hours it takes to execute on that, especially in proportion to how many of us there are compared to the entire player base... it just doesn't make sense.

    It doesn't make sense so much that the plot of each set is going to reduce in complexity.



    The only potential light at the end of the tunnel, a light that might not even be there, is that a simpler plot can be told more easily in comic book form. A huge problem with a lot of the webcomics is that they felt rushed. When you compared them to their counterparts in the novels, it was easy to see why. They were trying to tell too much in a limited page count.

    The dream for me, at this point, would be for a 12-part mini-series that covered the central story of each block. The planewalkers already do feel like comic book characters anyway, and climaxes that don't end in deaths of the villain in a comic book is standard practice. (Which would work nicely if the central antagonist happened to be a planeswalker like Nicol Bolas, Tezzeret, etc). It can work if the plot is simple enough, and good stories can still be told. Plenty of excellent stories have been told in 12-issue arcs, or even less.

    And if that dream can't be reached, I could be happy with a regular ongoing Magic comic book. Wizards cannot stop creating new planeswalkers because they need to mix in new ones with the familiar to keep people interested in the cards. And each year there will be more and more planeswalkers that can't be used for longer and longer periods of time. It can't be helped. A block without a single new planeswalker might work once if the overall theme is right, but two years in a row? Three? Players will feel cheated that Wizards is only recycling planeswalkers we've seen before. (Perhaps that will plateau. There is probably a number large enough that it won't matter, but that won't be any time soon.)

    With so many planeswalkers with nothing to do, it seems to me that it only makes sense to allow them to have more prominence in the comics. Maybe Dack will always be the main character, maybe not, but as the years pass IDW will have a larger stable of characters to pull from that are just gathering dust.

    If the comic line actually exists years from now. There's the rub. That can't ever happen if no one buys these comics that are coming out now.

    It's a good thing the comics are of a pretty high quality, and that IDW is the perfect publisher for Wizards to have made a deal with. And sales have been good enough that IDW is going forward with a second mini-series, but it could end there. Magic certainly doesn't sell enough to get front page status on their website, so my dream is probably already dead.

    But still... I'm doing my part and buying the comics. I haven't been disappointed in them so far, and at this point all I can do is hope the comic line doesn't end with The Spell Thief mini-series.


    I have to agree with this. And Im with you. The only thing we Vorthos can do is support and hope its enough. Buy the comics.
  • #33

    With so many planeswalkers with nothing to do, it seems to me that it only makes sense to allow them to have more prominence in the comics. Maybe Dack will always be the main character, maybe not, but as the years pass IDW will have a larger stable of characters to pull from that are just gathering dust.

    If the comic line actually exists years from now. There's the rub. That can't ever happen if no one buys these comics that are coming out now.

    It's a good thing the comics are of a pretty high quality, and that IDW is the perfect publisher for Wizards to have made a deal with. And sales have been good enough that IDW is going forward with a second mini-series, but it could end there. Magic certainly doesn't sell enough to get front page status on their website, so my dream is probably already dead.

    But still... I'm doing my part and buying the comics. I haven't been disappointed in them so far, and at this point all I can do is hope the comic line doesn't end with The Spell Thief mini-series.


    See, this is my beef with this partnership with IDW, as much as it is a promising vehicle for the continuity I was a bit disappointed that it had to be pretty much like a glorified fanfiction, that the only semblence of it's connection to the game is the planes and some noteworthy cameos. The Planeswalkers that are now in the card game are going to be lacking the continuity backing and could've used this venture.

    As much as it is good quality, there's this apparent disconnect factor to it that makes me turn away from actually actively buying it. Slant
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  • #34
    That's exactly why my ideal would be both an ongoing series where IDW has freedom to do what they need, but to also have a 12 issue mini series representing each block where Wizards had more input and gave more direction.
  • #35
    But according to your same line of argument, they wouldn't do that either, because the man hours involved wouldn't warrant the low potential for sales with these "continuity comics". In fact that was the reason Brady gave why there were so few webcomics and probably not many more coming. And even with it being on sale that equation won't change much due to the limited appeal.

    It comes back to having a large enough group of customers. Granted, comics books will have a wider appeal and if done right can work. But the same logic with brand products arises - the appeal is mostly limited to customers of the brand (MtG in this case) and not of all them might be willing to pay for a bit of storyline in a comic. Also, there is the problem of quality control (unless they somehow decide to really do it in-house) - same problem as with the novels -> who is gonna check that and how to ensure people who don't by themselves care as much about the characters to actually offer up quality comics? This might be the very reason they have this arrangement with IDW as not to bind to many resources. IDW can basically do what they want with their storylines, giving them greater control to deliver a quality story they care about and the "main story" doesn't get interfered with. I actually think it is a smart solution. Mind you not satisfactory at all for my sensibilites but smart nonetheless.

    We used to have comic books by Acclaim - so it can work. But then again, THEY went under... so...
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  • #36
    The comics still won't have anything to do with the actual block storyline or even the neowalkers we care about who have a fairly large amount of story behind them (Lili, Jace, Tezz).

    I haven't bought a comic in 13 years but went ahead and bought the first two idw comics. I was shocked by how short the comics were. Two $4 comics gave as much storyline as 1 chapter in an $8 book. I won't be buying these.
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  • #37
    I have already stated my piece in regards to the publications, StF, and other flavour-related noncard products and have no compulsion to reiterate; however, I am curious about the connection of novels and storylines.

    Was there a Homelands novel that escaped my notice? Or are the Ulgrotha lovers just a vocal minority? I know the comic existed and it is quite adequate in telling the story, but it hardly covers all the nuance that current fans demand.

    Now, I'm not saying that the book lines are unnecessary (and even if they are, I'd still like to have them produced), but when did it become indicative that we have such detailed and far-reaching accounts of our favourite planeswalkers and planes? As fans, it is our duty to ask for such things. I understand that. But when have we needed them so much to lament in the way that we do?

    Ultimately, what I'm asking is what changed that the little story booklet that came with the Tempest starter deck became insufficient?
  • #38
    Quote from Bracador

    Was there a Homelands novel that escaped my notice? Or are the Ulgrotha lovers just a vocal minority? I know the comic existed and it is quite adequate in telling the story, but it hardly covers all the nuance that current fans demand.

    Ultimately, what I'm asking is what changed that the little story booklet that came with the Tempest starter deck became insufficient?


    Homelands had a very detailed graphic novel with additional information and timelines in the back. Also, I think people found the characters compelling. Homelands was also not self-contained--Taysir, Ravidel, and Kristina had appeared in the other Armada comics and so their cameo appearances booster the story being told on Ulgrotha. This, coupled with the length of the comic and the world designed on the cards adds to Homelands appeal, I think. And Sengir. Serra and Sengir. Icons--I would imagine those were initial appeals, but I can't speak from experience from 1995. I think, too, Homelands offered a rather cohesive plot when compared to other prior sets (the other Armada comics were not set-specific).

    As for Tempest, it had a two-comic book series (Gerrard's Quest), a novel (Rath and Storm) and the story that played out on the card art and flavor text.

    I understand and support WotC's actions (though am saddened), but contexts were different back in Homelands and now.
  • #39
    i realy can't see a problem in a complex storyline within some cards.
    the argument is that pro players don't care about it, they just care about what the card does..so make a good card that the pros like, with a nice name and art that a Vorthos would like.
    but then we have the average player that likes the game just a bit, new sets, new stuff..again..print a whole set with just some of the cards showing parts of the story (like again Tempest). -> This would even help you sell the new characters (like jace and the others)..people would love to see Jace in a couple of cards...they did this on M12..but only with a couple of the (chandra's phoenix comes to mind). so this WOULD help..so why aren't they doing it? i honestly don't see a downside to it. granted they have studies and stuff...but i've been with this game a long time.. and i realy don't see the downside. you want to plane hop? so what's the problem? the Weatherlight crew went to Rath, Mercadia, Dominaria.. hell.. they could have hopped a long time.. and when they where in Rath (Nemesis), the next set showed us what was going on in Dominaria (Prophecy). i don't see where the problem is..but moving on.

    as for the books, i have all of them..and yes..plenty of them suck. and Brady is right when he says that good novels are hard to come by. but i also think that sells don't only depend on the product, but also on it's marketing. they never realy pushed the novels. (one can argue that their show is to sell cards, not books. that beeing said, they push a lot for the video game "Duel of the Planeswalkers" and they aren't a videogame company. or they are.. the point is that they can push and advertise what ever product they want that would enrich the main one that are cards).
    so i blame mostly the marketing strategy on books (mostly the..let's remove them from Fat Packs...another move i can't compreend. the fat pack now has 9 boosters, a dice, 2 cardboard boxes, the big box, and the check list for the set...most players only care about the boosters. so they took the great incentive Fat Packs had..the novels. again...can't understand it - besides money.

    why don't they do it like the Star Wars franchise? where many novels are written by different autors, and then they select the one's they like and print them?
    WotC would give strick Guide Lines, characters, and a finish line. the author would go to that finish line as he pleased. then WotC read it, and if it was ok, print it. - but i think for these to happen, people should be awared access to some details..the TimeLine for example. Each book in Star Wars have a simbol to identify the period it happens. Why can't this happen in Magic? to this day we still don't know how much time it passed since the events on Mirrodin and TimeSpiral..we are in a constant state of Guessing.

    i'm sorry for my arsh english and opinions, but in some matters WotC just seems sloppy, or simply uninterested, and with just a little effort, they could do so much more, better products, better materials, and by that sell more and more cards to more and more people, making the game grow and earning more money lol
  • #40
    I find it too harsh saying that "if WotC would have put a little effort in...", because especially Creative put in loads of effort! I'm sure they pushed very hard.
    I agree however with your point about marketing. But again, I wouldn't put it down to effort - rather to the reality of budgets. If Creative doesn't have enough budget to to prioritize or optimize marketing efforts, there's nothing they can really do no matter how dedicated. That's a managerial decision there - how much to spend on marketing efforts for each and every product. (btw, I'd love to see the data how the fat pack is selling now...)

    And the way you described the process of book writing - that's pretty much how WotC did that as well. They gave them a few guidelines, an outline what should be covered and then they waited for the result... Perhaps the fault there really lies with the selection of authors. Which again might be a derivative of a tight budget.

    Personally, I also fail to see the downside of having a puzzle like storyline told through the cards (apart from work, of course; but one might argue that isn't that much of a downside:tongue:).
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  • #41
    This is pretty much wotc's fault that they can't sell storybooks. A lot of problems included:

    -The book wasn't sold in most LGS where most players hang around
    -crappy storyline, cycles go way too fast. The whole weatherlight saga was a cool story, lots of intense moments, multi-year story, a lot of development of characters. Now instead we have planeswalker window shopping, they go to planes that they don't care, along with some legends that nobody cares either and probably don't even know the names. And each story gets abondoned in one year.
  • #42
    I'm not sure effort is the problem. The creative team can only do so much. Don't forget they have to supervise all the flavor elements of the game, meaning they are hiring artists, creating descriptions for every card in a set, etc. They work far in advance of set's actual release, but not so far as publishers usually need for a lead time. The timing on the books must have been hard because they had to give the authors vague story details to work with while they were still finalizing the flavor aspects.

    Honestly, the less focus there is on exact story events, the better it is for the game. When I played during the Weatherlight-era, a lot of the story-related stuff really turned me off, because they tied almost half the cards into moments from a story I didn't know about. I didn't dive into the story because it was too complex, with years of books to catch up on. My friends today love that they can understand the basics of the story without having to refer to a book.

    I, personally, really enoyed the Purifying Fire, and even Alara Unbroken was more readable than most people give it credit for (Quest for Karn, on the other hand...). I'm sad block novels didn't work out, but they weren't of the highest quality anyway (as opposed to Drew Karpyshyn's books based on Bioware games).

    I'd honestly be okay with a few more short stories telling what each planeswalker is up to and the general story (Legends should all be name dropped at least once to tell us who they are). The comics are okay so far, but I think being tied to blocks would severly hinder them, and give them event-itis, the worst thing you could do (event-itis is when all stories in a ongoing comic have to revolve around the yearly 'event', throwing off character development).

    Honestly, it sucks for us, but they clearly couldn't even manage proper copy editing on their novel releases (although that may have been the fault of the publisher). I say let it play out, and see how 'Return to Ravinca' works out.
  • #43
    I think we are all on the side of, "Let's just let it play out." We obviously can't do much except tell them how we feel, but on a business side they have to do what is best for the business. As I have previously stated I love the storylines; even with the relatively low amount of knowledge we got in this most recent set. For me personally though, I am worried about where this is going. For now I definitely have the wait and see attitude, but a couple of years down the road if the storyline doesn't exist anymore, I won't be playing. That I can guarantee. I like being able to tie the cards to the story and the characters within it. Without that the card game for me falls flat.
  • #44
    i think that Magic without a proper story line is like Yo Gy Oh, or Pokemon.. just another trading card game. i really can't see why is storytelling bad for the game, because if you don't care, you have the cards, if you care, you have the cards and the story.
    i'm not into the "let's wait and see"..because i think that path is going to the "no story what so ever".
    i know this is a business, and i really respect that, but here in this forum, there are really good ideas, that i think sometimes WotC could pick them up and use them (if they already don't do that).

    as for the "now i can comprehend the story, because it's simpler". that's fine with me also. you can have the general story told on comics, or Savor the Flavor, and then have a more comprehensive story in novels and stuff.
    i could see novels getting out not syncronized with the set (like the Artifact cycle), and it would still be awesome! we just want story, a baseline to know, lore!! - if they are released with the sets, that's fine, but if not.. i understand that.

    i think that magic lore is and untapped resource that they aren't using, and with a little work, it could be not only good for selling cards and characters, but also a independent source of money (like as i said the Star Wars books).
  • #45
    Quote from Tamiger15
    For me personally though, I am worried about where this is going. For now I definitely have the wait and see attitude, but a couple of years down the road if the storyline doesn't exist anymore, I won't be playing. That I can guarantee. I like being able to tie the cards to the story and the characters within it. Without that the card game for me falls flat.


    I definitely agree. Without the ties to story and characters on the card, we end up with Yu-Gi-Oh and similar card games where you have some pretty pictures, but no real background information.
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  • #46
    Quote from Eriol
    I definitely agree. Without the ties to story and characters on the card, we end up with Yu-Gi-Oh and similar card games where you have some pretty pictures, but no real background information.


    I loathe to see the day that happens. I took interest in Magic because I was so sick and tired of all the shallow, story-less card games out there.

    I truly hope Magic's lore is only taking a temporary hiatus.


    Quote from Multany

    i could see novels getting out not syncronized with the set (like the Artifact cycle), and it would still be awesome! we just want story, a baseline to know, lore!! - if they are released with the sets, that's fine, but if not.. i understand that.

    i think that magic lore is and untapped resource that they aren't using, and with a little work, it could be not only good for selling cards and characters, but also a independent source of money (like as i said the Star Wars books).

    Definitely agree with you there. They should honestly take the necessary amount of time and resources to produce a good novel, instead of rushing it to coincide with card releases. While that would be ideal, I'd rather they execute it well, versus making it on time. (Just hopefully not as long as it takes Blizzard to make most of their games though.)
    Last edited by Markov Bloodkeeper: 5/3/2012 5:49:55 PM
  • #47
    I think you may be right in your sentiment, the only problem is that you are grouping "Flavor Seekers" in with the whole wide range of Vorthoses, while it's actually only a tiny sub-set of the whole Vorthos spectrum. Brady said it himself that with the very best estimates, only 1 in 10,000 players ever bought a book that wasn't in a fat pack. 0.01%. That's it.

    (Non-fat pack books being relevant to them because the fat packs were discounted so that the books were given away for free, so only the 0.01% of players were actually contributing to their revenue.)

    Ahh but most people I know (not a huge sample size I admit) only bought the fat packs FOR the book. Their was like 0 distrabution outside of fatpacks. When fatpacks stopped having the book so too did sales of fat packs (again at least in my area) stop dead.


    And if that dream can't be reached, I could be happy with a regular ongoing Magic comic book. Wizards cannot stop creating new planeswalkers because they need to mix in new ones with the familiar to keep people interested in the cards. And each year there will be more and more planeswalkers that can't be used for longer and longer periods of time. It can't be helped. A block without a single new planeswalker might work once if the overall theme is right, but two years in a row? Three? Players will feel cheated that Wizards is only recycling planeswalkers we've seen before. (Perhaps that will plateau. There is probably a number large enough that it won't matter, but that won't be any time soon.)

    With so many planeswalkers with nothing to do, it seems to me that it only makes sense to allow them to have more prominence in the comics. Maybe Dack will always be the main character, maybe not, but as the years pass IDW will have a larger stable of characters to pull from that are just gathering dust.

    If the comic line actually exists years from now. There's the rub. That can't ever happen if no one buys these comics that are coming out now.

    It's a good thing the comics are of a pretty high quality, and that IDW is the perfect publisher for Wizards to have made a deal with. And sales have been good enough that IDW is going forward with a second mini-series, but it could end there. Magic certainly doesn't sell enough to get front page status on their website, so my dream is probably already dead.

    But still... I'm doing my part and buying the comics. I haven't been disappointed in them so far, and at this point all I can do is hope the comic line doesn't end with The Spell Thief mini-series.


    The problem is these will always be compaired to the best novels of the game's history (and they have some "good" novels not magic novels just good novels) I find it highly unlikely that I could ever get attached to a neo walker or any of these new characters the way I was to Urza or Yogomoth or Karn Or Gerrard ect. They just had so much backstory and good writting behind them.
    Stats About Mythics
    -Mythics are on average 40% rarer than pre-mythic rares
    (old blocks about 200 rares, Mythic blocks 35+ mythics)
    -They are printing more new cards a year not less
    (about 665 now vs. 630 in most pre-mythic block)
    -To drop the value of a rare by $1 a mythic must go up $2
    -In a 3 year time span deck prices doubled.
    I am petitioning for the removal of mythic rarity. Sig this to join the cause.
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